5 Exercises to Quit After 50 – You can still keep fit and avoid injuries if you follow these rules

Working out the same way in your 50s as you did in your 20s or 30s sets you up for pain and problems. Our bodies change as we age and muscular strength, bone density, flexibility, and recovery time make injuries more likely as you age if you don’t adjust your workout.
Your risk of injury will be greatly decreased by eliminating some exercises altogether.
My professors always taught that there are no bad exercises, just a lot of exercises used incorrectly. People are built differently and have varying levels of fitness. Make sure you have the flexibility and range of motion to be able to perform every exercise using proper form. Increase weight and repetitions incrementally over time to ensure you are able to handle the new stress.
In general, experts suggest avoiding the following exercises if you are over 50:
Heavy Leg Extension machine
This exercise involves extending the legs up out in front of you with resistance in front of your ankles while in a seated position on a machine. It isolates the quadriceps in front of the thighs and placed a significant amount of load across the knee joint.
This machine puts an unnecessary stress over the knee cap area, causing wear and tear in the knee joint. I still have some clients use this machine with light weight (less than 30 lbs) and perform the exercise single leg at the end of the workout, but never heavy. This can be a great rehab exercise or one of the worst single exercises for your knees if you use too much weight.
Instead, use squats, or wall sits to strengthen the same muscles without the risk of injuring your knees.
Pull ups or pull downs behind the head
This exercise works primarily the back muscles in addition to the biceps and shoulders. Behind the neck pull ups or pull downs places tremendous stress across the shoulders and rotator cuff tendons. Since rotator cuff injuries are very common after age 50 due to the lack of elasticity and strength, this exercise is not a good choice.
Safer and equally effective alternatives include pull ups or pull downs in front of the head, stopping the bar at the chest. Make sure to also utilize a horizontal row exercise or machine to also strengthen the muscles that support the back of the shoulders.
Sit ups
Sit ups have been one of the worst exercises for your lower back for decades. Yet, many people (including the military) continue to use this exercise for abdominal strength. The military is finally looking to replace sit ups due to the increased rate of injury for troops. They are studying planks as a better alternative to the injury prone sit up.
When we talk core strength, we mean 3 areas (abs, lower back, and obliques) and most people only focus on the first one. Balance out your workout with exercises that will strengthen the other 2 areas. Which leads us to the next exercise.
Flutter Kicks
This is also a staple of the military and many fitness fans that only focus on the abdominal section of their core. This exercise places a significant load on the abs and even more load on the lower back that you have not been working to strengthen. It will work your abs, but usually at the cost of your lower back.
Again, balance your core routine. Any exercise that places a load on your core means that your lower back is supporting musculature. If you lower back is not capable of handling this load, you will end up with a lower back injury, and a lifetime of lower back problems.
Good Mornings
This is meant to be a back-strengthening exercise that involves placing the weight behind your head while bending forward from the waist with your legs straight and knees locked, where you use your lower back muscles to pull yourself back up. This move can cause issues for you if you have any type of lumbar (lower back) instability or stenosis.
Stick with a whole body exercise like deadlifts that will strengthen your back, glutes, hamstrings, and even upper back. The body does not work well placing a load against isolated muscles across a single joint. The body works by spreading the load out against multiple muscles and joints. Isolation is great for rehab and body building, but not to build functional strength. If utilized incorrectly or with too much load, it causes injury.
Any exercise that you perform should have a purpose (i.e. strengthen specific muscles or movement patterns). Performing exercises that do not directly relate to your goals is a waste of your time and increases your risk of injury. Start with lighter weights using combined motions, such as squats versus single joint movements like leg extensions, that are not as functional.
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